Friday, July 27, 2007

Another attempt at writing a teaser

My friends up in Canada :-) are asking for some info on this. so: Another whack at writing a summary i.e. for the DVD jacket or promotional blurb or promo voiceover. It's none of those 3 things quite exactly, but getting closer. It's still a bit too wordy and repetitive. Here goes:

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How did high-tech start? On the radio!

The usual story of Silicon Valley begins with Stanford, HP, and the Varian brothers. In 1953. Yet more than 40 years earlier, the orchards and wheat fields on San Francisco Bay's southern shore were already buzzing with high technology. Back then, it was simply called "radio".

Pioneers such as Lee DeForest and Charles Herrold were pushing the state of the art, perfecting the vacuum tube and being truly the first to broadcast regularly scheduled entertainment programming.

And one Arthur E. Bessey, a Canadian immigrant, respected businessman, and personal friend of radio engineering godfather Edwin H. Armstrong, deprecated his family's agricultural equipment business in pursuit of "the wireless". His was the first Silicon Valley technology factory, building up to 150 consumer radio sets per day. Eighty years later, they still regularly make the online auction circuit. Yet he lost his fortune, his father, his son, and his place in history.

ECHO OF THE FUTURE: A TALE OF SUNNYVALE explores why the first electronics company, in a city that describes itself as the "Heart of Silicon Valley", would be so unknown. The answer, and optimistic prospects for future historic preservation, turn out to be intimately linked with what happened one misty September morning in 1961.

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Less-than-125-word version:


How did the Silicon Valley start?

The usual story begins with Stanford and HP in 1953.

Yet 40 years earlier, San Francisco Bay's southern shore was already buzzing with technology -- in the form of radio.

Well-known pioneers Lee DeForest and Charles Herrold were perfecting both radio hardware and schedules.

And one Arthur E. Bessey, Canadian immigrant, respected businessman, and friend of radio engineering godfather Edwin H. Armstrong, risked all and lost big. His "Radio Shop" was the first large technology factory in the area, building 150 radios per day.

Eighty years later, they still circulate online and some even work.

So why is he unknown today?

The answer is linked to what happened one misty September morning in 1961 in Sunnyvale, the "Heart of the Silicon Valley".

Thursday, July 26, 2007

Wire Removal

Just beginning to work on taking the Radio shots and removing the cruft and moving / shadow things. The lid will look like it's opening all by itself.